Cabbages

CABBAGES ARE GREAT FERMENTED INTO SAUERKRAUT FOR A HEALTHY GUT

And don't just stop with green cabbages. You can also try your hand are red ones.

PLANTING

Cabbages are a member of the brassica family, and like broccoli and cauliflower have quite small seeds. Plant them 50cm apart to allow lots of space to grow. Plant by poking one finger into the soil, first knuckle deep, and placing 2 seeds in the hole. If both seeds sprout, remove the weakest one next month.

CONTAINER PLANTING

Aim for a pot at leave 30cm deep and plant one cabbage per pot.

CROP ROTATION

Cabbages are a leaf crop which means they follow legumes in the crop rotation cycle. This is because legumes excrete nitrogen, which cabbages thrive on. In fact, if you want your cabbages to ball up, then you will need to ensure there is plenty of nitrogen available in the early weeks.

COMPANION PLANTING

Cabbages row happily with other autumn crops like onions, celery, peas and snow peas, beetroot, garlic and with potatoes.

SUCCESSION PLANTING

Cabbages are appropriate for succession planting. I would plant 2 every month so that you have one maturing every few weeks. However, if you live in a climate that experiences days of 5 degrees or under, then the cabbages growth with slow considerably during winter. Therefore you may as well plant all your cabbages now and harvest as needed in winter. This is because your vegetable garden will be like one giant outdoor fridge with crops keeping better outside than in.

FERTILISER

As a cabbage is mostly leaves, it will benefit greatly from a teaspoon coffee grinds every few weeks. This is keep the nitrogen levels up and help it to grow large and lush.

PEST MANAGEMENT

The biggest issue you will face are cabbage moths, closely followed by snails.  To help you learn how to combat these pests organically, I have created a 

FREE online course.

Here are some other posts I have done:

 

HARVEST

When it comes to harvesting you will want to take a sharp kitchen knife with you. The cabbage root is very deep and quite hard to pull out. Best to cut the cabbage off and remove the root later. You can even leave it to decompose in the soil. If you cabbage hasn't balled up, it doesn't matter. It still looks and tastes the same when it is all cut up.

Cabbages